Archive - May 2006

Date
Type

May 31st

2006 Mugello Round Preview - A Tuscan Tale

Motorcycle racing, like life, is full of little ironies. One such irony is that despite the fact that three of the five favorites for this year's MotoGP title, the current five-time World Champion and one of the leading factories taking part are Italian, this weekend's Italian Grand Prix at Mugello is the only MotoGP race in Italy this year. And this in spite of the fact that Italy has so many glorious circuits with a long and rich history: Monza, with its majestic and insanely fast Parabolica, the tree-lined Imola, Misano's sweeping Curvone Veloce, and this weekend's venue, Mugello.

Race results and championship standings
round_number: 
6
2006

May 23rd

Breaking News - Rossi To Stay in MotoGP in 2007

According to this story over at SuperbikePlanet.com, "sources close to Valentino Rossi" have informed Ferrari that Valentino will be staying in MotoGP next season. If I find out any more, I'll post it here.

May 21st

2006 Le Mans Race Report - A Twist of Fate

The 2006 MotoGP season is certain to go down in history as one of the most memorable, and most surprising, for a very, very long time. Added to an electric mix of new young talent come up from 250s and over from Superbikes, and capable of immediately running at the front, have been a series of racing incidents and mechanical failures which have totally reshaped the face of MotoGP. And what has caused so much consternation is that much of this has centered around Valentino Rossi. Where once The Doctor was made of Teflon, with crashes, engine blowups and rivals seemingly incapable of touching him, and each championship a foregone conclusion, this year, hardly a race has gone by without the hand of fate attempting to thwart his every move. Le Mans turned out to be another such race.

Race results and championship standings
round_number: 
5
2006

May 20th

2006 Le Mans Qualifying Practice - Return of the Young Challenger

The rain clouds which had caused problems during this morning's free practice session had disappeared by this afternoon, allowing the track to dry out and warm up a little. The strong winds, which had earlier blown a temporary commentary unit over, complete with worried journalists, remained, however. With everyone worried about the possibility of the rain returning later in the session, all 19 riders took off as soon as the green flag dropped, reasoning that a half-decent time might turn into a pole if the track got wet. After the first ten minutes, John Hopkins topped the timesheets with a respectable 1:36.22, with Sete Gibernau in second. The Yamahas and Kawasakis were prominent in the times, including Frenchman Randy de Puniet. De Puniet has plenty to live up to, having scored podiums at Le Mans for the last four races in a row, albeit in the 250 class. Aboard the Kawaski, in his first season of MotoGP, he faces a much tougher task this year.

2006 Le Mans Day 2 Free Practice Session 3

As expected, the last free practice session before this afternoon's official qualifying practice was dogged by rain and difficult conditions. With the rain expected to continue this afternoon, the result looks interesting. Accomplished rain riders had a mixed morning, some doing well, others doing surprisingly dismally. Kenny Roberts Junior, after starting the session slowly, shot to the top of the standings with 10 minutes to go, putting in a series of consistently fast laps, over a second ahead of the rest, only to have his time beaten by a great lap by Casey Stoner aboard the LCR Honda. In third place is Kawasaki's Shinya Nakano, another rider who was at the front for much of the session.

May 19th

New DVD About The 2005 US GP at Laguna Seca

I'm sure many of you will have seen the fantastic film Faster, the story of the last year of the 500 cc two-strokes, and the first year of the MotoGP bikes. It's a sumptuously filmed and directed documentary, the restrained style of the commentary beautifully juxtaposing the white-knuckle action of onboard and trackside footage. For those of you who haven't seen it, you really are missing one of the best sports documentaries ever made.

Now the director of that great movie has made another film about MotoGP:
The Doctor, The Tornado And The Kentucky Kid
This film is about the 2005 US MotoGP round at Laguna Seca, a fantastic race won in a superb showing by Nicky Hayden, the race which turned Nicky, who had been struggling to be consistent until then, into a contender. Laguna is a fantastic track, with one of the most demanding and frightening sections in the world, as the riders crest a blind left-hander, travelling fast, before swooping down into the sweeping Corkscrew, heeled hard over with the suspension gone light from the crest, riding a fine line between glory and disaster. If Faster is anything to go by, this can only be a great movie. Check it out.

2006 Le Mans Day 1 Free Practice Session 2

Either Yamaha have found a solution to their problems, or the cold weather is reducing grip enough for the Yamaha not to suffer its usual chatter. This afternoon's session was another Yamaha 1-2, this time with Texan Tornado Colin Edwards taking top spot after leading throughout the session, followed closely by team mate Valentino Rossi. 2/10ths behind Rossi we have Nakano on the Kawasaki and Hopkins on the Rizla Suzuki. Le Mans is the Kawasaki's home test track, so it's no real surprise to see Harald Eckl's Green Machine doing well here. Hopkins is obviously on a roll, from his excellent fourth place in Shanghai.

2006 Le Mans Free Practice Day 1

In my race preview, I ventured that poor weather would favor rain riders, the Yamahas and the Suzukis. I was part right, as today's first Free Practice session, held in cold and cloudy conditions, were dominated by the Yamahas, Valentino Rossi being over a second quicker than everyone else for most of the session. With Edwards second fastest, it's still unclear whether these fast times are down to the new Yamaha M1 chassis, or the reduced grip induced by the cool conditions.

May 18th

Rossi Gets New Chassis For Le Mans

After struggling to cure the chronic chatter problems which have plagued the 2006 Yamaha M1, it looks like the engineers have finally admitted defeat. Valentino Rossi will be riding a bike fitted with a new chassis, based on the chassis of his championship winning 2005 Yamaha. It's a big gamble to take, as Rossi's pit crew, led by Jeremy Burgess, will have to work flat out to find a setup which works with the new frame, but with The Doctor trailing by 32 points in the championship, they cannot afford to lose any more points, especially after chatter helped to destroy his front Michelin in Shanghai.

The full story can be found on Crash.net

 

May 17th

2006 MotoGP Le Mans Round Preview

Le Mans, The Legend

Le Mans is one of the legendary names in motorsports. Everyone, from die-hard gearheads to your Aunt Shirley, has heard of Le Mans. It conjures up images of heroic racers plunging through the depths of night, with only their headlights to light the way down endless straights, and brave souls fighting off sleep to race through the last few hours before the finish. Sadly, when the MotoGP circus arrives back in France, they won't be racing at the classic Le Mans 24 hour track, but at the short Bugatti GP circuit. Where the 24 hour track oozes character and racing romance, the Bugatti circuit is bland, all long straights and sharp hairpin turns, with just a few touches from the long track, such as the classic Dunlop bridge, turn and chicane, before withering away in a series of straights and hairpins.

Race results and championship standings
round_number: 
5
2006

May 16th

2006 Shanghai Race Report - Pedrosa Arrives

Luck Be A Lady

Yellow is Valentino Rossi's lucky color, and as such, he always tried to incorporate some yellow in his riding gear somewhere. So when Camel, whose corporate color is yellow, announced that they would be sponsoring the works Yamaha team this year, a cry of despair could be heard throughout the MotoGP paddock. Valentino Rossi had already proven to be the world's luckiest motorcycle racer, staying on board highsiders which threw other riders off, keeping engines running after crashes where others had stalled. If there was one thing that no one felt Rossi needed more of, it was luck. But since the start of the season, luck is what Rossi has had, by the bucket load.

However, as anyone who has tried their hand at cards or dice is surely aware, luck comes in two flavors: the kind you want, and the kind you wish on your competitors. Where in previous years, Rossi seemed to have a virtual monopoly on good fortune, this season, Lady Luck has shown Valentino an aspect he hasn't seen before, the kind of bad luck which causes chronic chatter to appear during the first race of the year, after having dominated during pre-season testing. And so it was at Shanghai this weekend, where it looked like Rossi's luck had returned, only for his hopes to be shattered in a shower of tire debris.

Race results and championship standings
round_number: 
4
2006

May 12th

Race Reports Announcement

Due to poor holiday planning, I shall be away this weekend, and will not be able to provide a race report for the Shanghai MotoGP race until Monday evening (European time). I apologise for the inconvenience.

2006 Shanghai Free Practice - Day 1

Well, as expected, it rained all day Friday, providing another day of wet practice. And as expected, Bridgestone showed it has good rain tyres. What was less expected was that Yamaha seems to have found some kind of a solution to their problems this year, with Valentino Rossi topping both qualifying sessions.

Results Free Practice 1:

 

May 11th

2006 MotoGP Shanghai Round Preview

Under The Weather

This weekend, the MotoGP circus descends on the third new MotoGP track in a row, in Shanghai, China. The last of the new tracks, and, many say, the least. Where Istanbul has its fantastic rolling layout, and do-or-die last chicane before the finish straight, and Qatar has its great combinations of fast and slow bends, though hampered by the flatness of the Losail topography, Shanghai suffers from being designed to fit an idea. Or rather, an ideogram, as the track layout is loosely modeled on the Chinese character "Shang", meaning high, or above, part of Shanghai's name. The result is a strange combination of the fastest straight of the season, where speeds reach nearly 215 mph, followed by the slowest corner (though the remodeled Strubben at Assen may also be a contender for that honor), making for one of the slowest average speeds all year. The long, slow corners are great for Formula 1 cars, but a good deal less fun on a racing motorcycle, and it shows.

Race results and championship standings
round_number: 
4
2006

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