Motegi, Japan

Interview: Nicolas Goyon, Pol Espargaro's Crew Chief, On Developing The Yamaha M1 To Exploit The Strengths Of Moto2 Riders

Many MotoGP followers, both inside and outside the paddock, were sceptical when news leaked that Yamaha had signed Pol Espargaro to a factory contract early in 2013. A year later, and halfway through his first MotoGP season, that scepticism has been replaced with admiration. The younger of the two Espargaro brothers is the best satellite rider in the championship standings, and has been competitive from the start of the season.

Yamaha clearly had a plan with Pol Espargaro. The riding style which young racers develop in Moto2 is very different from the style which came from the 250cc class. Where Moto2 racers use a sliding rear tire to help turn the bike into the corners, the 250 two-strokes rewarded riders who could brake early and carry as much corner speed as possible. The Yamaha YZR-M1 has been primarily developed around the 250cc style, but as riders schooled in the Moto2 class enter MotoGP, Yamaha realized they will have to adapt their bike to this new generation of young riders. By signing the reigning Moto2 champion, Yamaha have started to seriously examine how the new intermediate class is affecting MotoGP bike development.

Leading this development has been Pol Espargaro's crew chief, Nicolas Goyon. The Frenchman has been a data and electronics engineer in MotoGP since 2003, the first year in which the class switched over fully to four strokes. With the departure of Daniele Romagnoli, who followed Cal Crutchlow to Ducati, Goyon was given the role of crew chief to MotoGP rookie Espargaro. Since then, Goyon has been working with the Moto2 champion and Yamaha to explore how the Moto2 style can be made to fit to the Yamaha M1. We spoke to Goyon after the Brno test, to ask him about how he had adapted the bike and the feedback Pol Espargaro was providing.

MotoMatters.com: We know what the Yamaha style is to be as smooth as possible and to carry as much corner speed as possible and not upset the bike. That means braking in a straight line, keeping your wheels in line as much as possible. A few times, Pol Espargaro has been riding in more of a Moto2-style. First of all, why did he decide to do it, and did he talk to you about it?

Nicolas Goyon: Yes, of course. This is one direction Yamaha wanted to try, and obviously, Pol is the first Moto2 world champion working with Yamaha, and so Yamaha is really interested in this new style. We realize that all the Moto2 riders, the new generation of riders, they have a specific style, one we all know, they have the elbow on the ground, their bike is shaking from the rear on braking. Pol is really the first guy with this style working with Yamaha.

2014 Imola World Superbike Race One Result

Nineteen laps in the morning's race at 22ºC.

2014 MotoGP Calendar Finalized, Brazil Dropped, Aragon Moved

The FIM has today released the final, official version of the 2014 MotoGP calendar. As expected, the Brazil round has been dropped, after it became clear that construction work at the Autodromo Nelson Piquet in Brasilia would not be completed in time for the September round. To ease the congestion in that part of the season, the date of the Aragon round has now been pushed back a week, and will take place on 28th September, the date originally scheduled for Brazil.

The dropping of the Brazil round had been expected almost from the moment it was placed on the schedule. There were serious doubts that the circuit would be able to make the necessary changes in time for September 2014, and teams were informed of the doubts which Dorna and IRTA had. The inclusion of Brazil was a statement of intent, with both Dorna and the manufacturers keen to return to South America, as both Brazil and Argentina are key markets. Actually racing in Brazil will depend one of the circuits still in the country being able to make the necessary modifications to make it safe enough for Grand Prix motorcycles.

Below is the official, finalized version of the 2014 MotoGP calendar:

Suzuki MotoGP Video Series, Part 2: When Randy Met Davide

Continuing their video series on the progress of their MotoGP project, Suzuki today released the second part of the series. Today's video documents the first tests which Suzuki undertook at Motegi in April and May, after signing Randy de Puniet as test rider and Davide Brivio to manage the program.

The first task De Puniet was set was testing the Suzuki GSV-R 800 bike back-to-back with the new 1000cc bike. De Puniet had previously tested the 800cc bike at Valencia at the end of the 2011 season, before Suzuki decided to pull out of MotoGP temporarily. The two bikes have radically different designs: the 800cc bike had a narrow angle V4 engine layout, while the 1000cc is an inline four with a big bang layout, along the lines of Yamaha's M1. De Puniet's comments on the two machines give an interesting insight into the difference the new regulations have made.

Below is the second video in the series. If you'd like to catch up with the first video, you can see it here.

2014 MotoGP Calendar Changed, Japan, Australia, Malaysia Reshuffled

The first major change to the 2014 MotoGP schedule has been announced. Though the dates remain the same, the order of the Asian flyaway triple header has been reshuffled, with Sepang moving from first of the three to last. The Grand Prix classes will now head to Japan first, for the Japanese GP at Motegi on 12th October, before heading south to Australia for the Phillip Island round a week later, on 19th October. The weekend after that the MotoGP paddock visits Malaysia, for the last of the three overseas races at Sepang on 26th October.

The change is unlikely to be the last. It is widely anticipated that the new track in Brasilia will not be ready for the Brazilian round of MotoGP on 28th September, and that the Motorland Aragon race, due to take place on 21st September, will be rescheduled for a week later. That decision will not take place for some time, however, as the Autodromo Brasilia Nelson Piquet will be given a few more months before the mandatory circuit homologation inspection. 

Below is the updated, and still provisional, 2014 MotoGP calendar, with changes highlighted in bold. You can always find the latest, most up-to-date version including all changes on this page

2014 MotoGP Calendar

The 2014 MotoGP calendar:

Bridgestone Press Release: Shinji Aoki On Giving Riders More Tire Choices At Motegi

After a disastrous outing at Phillip Island, Bridgestone returned to Motegi better armed to deal with the circumstances. The weather did its best to prevent the race from happening, but Bridgestone's tires handled the circumstances well. In the traditional post-race debrief press release, Shinji Aoki explains how well Bridgestone's tires worked in the wet, and how their strategy of providing more tire choice to the riders, by producing two tire choices they can use, worked well enough at Motegi to have both compounds on the podium. 


Japanese MotoGP™ debrief with Shinji Aoki
Wednesday 30 October 2013

Bridgestone slick compounds: Front: Soft & Medium. Rear: Super-soft (Asymmetric) Extra-soft (Symmetric) & Soft (Asymmetric)
Bridgestone wet tyre compounds: Soft (Main) & Hard (Alternative)

Last Sunday, Yamaha Factory Racing’s Jorge Lorenzo won his second consecutive race after taking victory at the Japanese Grand Prix ahead of Repsol Honda duo Marc Marquez and Dani Pedrosa.

Poor weather conditions resulted in all Friday practice sessions being cancelled, with the MotoGP™ riders getting their first taste of action in a wet qualifying session on Saturday afternoon. Conditions improved for race day, with a dry track greeting riders for the twenty-four lap Japanese Grand Prix.

Round Number: 
17
Year: 
2013

2013 Motegi MotoGP Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams after Sunday's Japanese Grand Prix at Motegi:

Round Number: 
17
Year: 
2013

2013 Motegi Moto2 And Moto3 Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the Moto2 and Moto3 teams after Sunday's race at Motegi:

Round Number: 
17
Year: 
2013

2013 Motegi MotoGP Sunday Round Up: On The Unpredictability Of Racing, And Why You Should Never Trust Pundits

There have been occasions over the past few years when I have asked Nicky Hayden how he manages to find the motivation to keep racing every Sunday. His answer is always the same, whether I have asked him after a surprise podium, or after coming in tenth: 'You never know what can happen in the race. That's why we line up.' Hayden is living testament to his own deeply driven mixture of ambition, hope and determination. His 2006 championship was won against the odds, and against the greatest rider of the period at the height of his powers.

Sunday's races at Motegi - indeed, the races at all three of the flyaways - have been a shining example of the vicissitudes of racing. In all three classes, the presupposed script was torn up and thrown away. In Moto3, young men facing pressure made major mistakes. In Moto2, one astounding comeback met with disaster, another astounding comeback met with triumph, and a championship. And in MotoGP, the champion elect as of a couple of races ago is finding himself having to fight for his title. The season is only over once everyone crosses the line for the last time at Valencia.

2013 MotoGP Championship Standings After Round 17, Motegi, Japan

MotoGP Championship standings for round 17, 2013

2013 Moto2 Championship Standings After Round 17, Motegi, Japan

Championship standings for round 17, 2013

2013 Moto3 Championship Standings After Round 17, Motegi, Japan

Championship standings for round 17, 2013

2013 Motegi MotoGP Race Result: Subdued Affair After Gripping Day

Full report and results below:

2013 Motegi Moto2 Race Result: No End To High Drama

Full report and results below:

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